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How Many Disabled Parking Sign Posts Does Your Lot Need?

Having the correct number of disabled parking sign posts is important for any parking lot owner or manager.  Failure to comply with ADA guidelines not only leads to possible fines, but it also creates unnecessary barriers for the physically challenged in society.  Fortunately, the rules laid out by the ADA are clear and simple in this regard.  Here’s a breakdown of how they work.

Total number of parking spaces in facility

Minimum required number of accessible spaces

1-25

1 space

26-50

2 spaces

51-75

3 spaces

76-100

4 spaces

101-150

5 spaces

151-200

6 spaces

201-300

7 spaces

301-400

8 spaces

401-500

9 spaces

501-1000

2% of the total spaces

Above 1000

20 spaces +1 for each 100, or fraction of 100, additional spaces

 

Additional Disabled Parking Sign Post Rules

  • One of every six ADA parking spaces in a lot must be van-accessible. For instance, assume that a given lot has 400 total spaces.  The ADA requires that out of those, eight must be handicapped-accessible, and of those eight, two should be van-accessible.
  • Current rules allow for a “safe harbor” for lots that meet the 1991 ADA standards but not the 2010 updates.  The law exempts them from having to meet the updated requirements until and unless a major renovation project, such as a lot restriping, is completed.  At that time, the lot must be renovated to meet the newest standards.
  • Lots that serve a single location, such as the parking area for sports stadiums, should have their disabled parking sign posts and spots placed as close to the destination facility as possible.  On the other hand, lots that serve a variety of destinations, such as a parking area surrounded by a variety of retailers, should have their accessible spots distributed as evenly as possible throughout the lot.
  • Disabled parking sign posts should display the universal symbol of a handicapped person in a wheelchair for easy recognition.

Conclusion

The rules that govern placement of disabled parking sign posts are reasonable and easy to understand.  By complying with these regulations, lot owners and managers can help to ensure a more pleasant and accessible environment for all.